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Master Class on "On the God of the Christians" with Rémi Brague

Nov 7 2014 3—6pm
Gavin House
1220 E 58th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
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Rémi Brague

Sorbonne, Ludwig Maximillian University of Munich

A master class discussion on
On the God of the Christians (and one or two others) by Rémi Brague

with Rémi Brague (Sorbonne/University of Munich)

REGISTER HERE

In this one-off seminar, participants will discuss the bookOn the God of the Christians with the author, philosopher Rémi Brague. They will discuss Prof. Brague’s philosophical treatment of the unique character of the Christian conception of God among religions and philosophies. Topics will include the nature of Christian monotheism; revelation; the relation of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism; the Trinity; the Good; and human freedom.

Participants will be provided with a complimentary copy of the book and are required to read in in preparation for the seminar.

“Rémi Brague is one of the few scholars alive who is equally an expert on medieval Arabic, Jewish, and Latin philosophy (as well as on ancient Greek philosophy). He is an extraordinary linguist in both ancient and modern languages, which enables a truly subtle analysis of texts and ideas.”
—Kent Emery, Jr. (Professor of Liberal Studies, University of Notre Dame)

This master class is open to all graduate and undergraduate students, including non-University of Chicago students. Copies of the book can be mailed or picked up at Gavin House.  Space is limited and offered on a first-come, first-served basis. If you have any questions, please contact Mark Franzen.

Rémi Brague is Professor Emeritus of Arabic and Religious Philosophy at the Sorbonne and Romano Guardini Chair of Philosophy at the Ludwig Maximillian University of Munich. In 2012, he was awarded the Ratzinger Prize for Theology. He is author of numerous books on classical and medieval culture, religion, literature, and law, includingEccentric Culture: A Theory of Western Civilization and Law of God: The Philosophical History of an Idea.