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Two-Day Online Seminar | Galileo: Faith, Reason, and the New Science

Aug 1013, 2022
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Robert PorwollGustavus Adolphus College

TWO-DAY ONLINE SEMINAR

Session 1: Wednesday, Aug. 10 | 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 

Session 2: Saturday, Aug. 13 | 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. 

REGISTER HERE (Registration will close at 10:00 p.m. CDT on Tuesday, Aug. 9)

The Lumen Christi Institute has designed this two-day seminar to introduce major themes and debates from the Catholic Church's history to a wide online audience. It offers the opportunity to read primary sources in the context of a seminar-style discussion, led by Catholic faculty.  

*This course requires no advance training nor prior reading and is open to all for participation. All course reading will be provided electronically. 

What happened at the famous Galileo Trial? Galileo Galilei (1564 – 1642) remains a hero of early modern science and is considered a ‘father of modern science.’ His work on Copernican theory and his famous trial have won him a place as a champion of reason and science against the apparent forces of irrational power and authoritarianism. But does the Galileo of history match the Galileo of legend? This course will introduce important contexts before examining Galileo’s own views on faith and reason, the documents and history of Galileo’s later inquisitorial trial, and finally discussing the ways we might interpret Galileo’s meaning today.

COURSE SCHEDULE

Week before class begins:

Online videos will be available for contextualizing and framing our discussion. 

Another video will introduce the mechanics of the course, course expectations and methods. 

 

Wednesday 8/10, 6:00 pm-7:30pm 

Session 1: Galileo the Astronomer and Theologian

 

Saturday 8/13, 10:30am-12:00pm 

Session 2: Galileo and the Inquisition

 

Saturday 8/13, 1:00pm-2:30pm 

Session 3: Which Galileo?

Click here to see the full syllabus.


Registration | $95


Questions | Austin Walker, awalker@lumenchristi.org

Robert Porwoll has taught courses for the University of Chicago Graham School and History Department, and he is currently a visiting professor at Gustavus Adolphus College. His research includes the Christian liberal arts tradition in education, with a specialized focus on the liberal arts in Christian education at schools and at early medieval universities. He studied Historical Theology at Saint Louis University (MA) and the History of Christianity at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago (PhD). His scholarship includes the relationship of faith and reason, religious environmental ethics, Neoplatonic and scholastic thought, and the medieval School of Saint Victor Abbey (Paris).