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Human Rights and Human Wrongs: The Catholic History of Human Rights

Nov 14, 2020
University of Saint Mary of the Lake
1000 East Maple Avenue
Mundelein, IL 60060
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Paolo CarozzaUniversity of Notre Dame

Presented by the Lumen Christi Institute’s Newman Forum. Open to current high school students. This event was made possible by a grant from the Our Sunday Visitor Institute, and is cosponsored by the University of Saint Mary of the Lake, Mundelein Seminary, and the Archdiocese of Chicago Vocation Office. 

You can email Austin Walker or Madison Chastain with any questions or concerns!

 

Online Schedule

9:30 Opening Prayer & Welcome

9:45 1st Lecture

10:20 1st Q&A

10:45 Break

11:00 2nd Lecture

11:35 2nd Q&A

11:45pm Online Breakout Discussion Groups

12:30pm Conclusion


What makes something right?  What makes something wrong? What is a "right," and why ought it be respected? What happens if two people's rights come into conflict? What is justice? Why (and how) ought it be pursued?The Newman Forum is excited to continue its yearly tradition of day-long academic conferences during the Autumn and Winter Quarters. 

On Saturday, November 14, the Newman Forum will host a conference about the relationship between rights, justice, and--the theme we've chosen for our year--human dignity. Professor Paolo Carozza will introduce us to the development of the earliest human rights tradition by Spanish Dominicans in the 16th century, and chart the course of its expansion into our contemporary language of human rights and social justice, which fails to achieve its ends when it loses the Catholic understanding of human dignity. It can seem to us that the Catholic Church is new to topics of justice and rights, but not only were Catholics some of the first to develop the language of rights and justice, but the Catholic understanding of human dignity is pivotal to our contemporary pursuit of a just society!


This November, our fall conference will be a hybrid event. IN-PERSON REGISTRATION IS CLOSED. 

High school teachers and youth ministers are encouraged to bring online groups. If they so desire, they will be given their own virtual discussion room after the lectures to discuss the content with their students. Otherwise, your students can be assigned to a group led by one of our trained graduate-student discussion leaders. A separate pre-event prep meeting is offered to teachers who would like it.

In-Person Schedule

9:00 Grab-and-go breakfast (Coffee Room)

9:30 Prayer and Welcome (Chapel)

9:45 1st Lecture (Chapel)

10:20 1st Q&A (Chapel)

10:45 Break & Snack (Coffee Room)

11:00 2nd Lecture (Chapel)

11:35 2nd Q&A (Chapel)

11:45 Transition to Eucharistic Adoration (Chapel)

12:10pm Grab-and-Go Lunch (Coffee Room) & Discussion Groups (Breakout Rooms)

1:00pm Final Q&A (Chapel)

1:30pm Closing Prayer (Chapel)

There will be mandatory health screenings at the start of the in-person experience. Masks will be required at all times during the day, except for when students are eating. Refusal to wear a mask or follow appropriate social distancing protocols will be grounds for removal from the event, as it will violate the Newman Forum's contract with Mundelein Seminary. 


 

Paolo Carozza is the director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and professor of law and concurrent professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame. He holds an AB from Harvard University and a JD from Harvard Law School and was a postgraduate Ford Foundation Fellow in Public International Law at Harvard Law School. With expertise in comparative constitutional law, human rights, law and development, and international law, he focuses his research on Latin America, Western Europe, and international themes more broadly. Widely published, Carozza’s most recent books include Italian Constitutional Justice in Global Context (with Vittoria Barsotti, Marta Cartabia, and Andrea Simoncini) (Oxford University Press, 2016), Comparative Legal Traditions (with Mary Ann Glendon and Colin B. Picker) (4th ed., West Academic Publishing, 2014), and Regional Protection of Human Rights (with Dinah L. Shelton) (2nd ed., Oxford University Press, 2013). His numerous articles, published in four languages, have focused primarily on foundational principles of human rights law, such as human dignity, democracy, and subsidiarity.